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  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Post [Tutorial] Set Up TeamSpeak Server with Domain Name

    So, you have a computer you want to turn into a TeamSpeak server? Some of my homies wanted to know how I set us up our guild TeamSpeak server a while back, and while I haven't up until this point gotten around to writing them up anything, I figured I'd just share with everyone and knock it all out of the way. This is pretty much going to cover the basic steps and terminology so you won't have to do as much research as I did.

    None of these steps are optional.

    Set Up Static Local IP

    Before you do anything, you have to make sure your computer doesn't go **changing IP addresses each time it connects to the router. I'm using Windows 7 for my server, so if you're using something else.... translate or something. Go to Control Panel > Network and Sharing Center > Change Adapter Settings. Right click on the LAN connection (because you're inevitably going to want to use LAN over wireless if you want your server to be lag free trust me) and go to properties. Under the networking tab, select Internet Protocol Version 4(TCP/IPv4) and go to Properties. You're going to want to tell the adapter all of the values you want it to use. Fortunately, we only have to be creative with one of those fields. Open up a command console and type 'ipconfig /all'. Find the adapter you are going to use and it will list the Subnet Mask, Default Gateway, and 2 DNS server IPs (Preferred/Alternate). You'll probably want to try to use an IP address close to what the rest of your IP's are: (192.168.0.XX) Century Link, (10.0.0.XX) Comcast. Right. You may have to refresh your settings, so reboot or go to command console and type 'ipconfig /release' and 'ipconfig /renew'.

    Mac OS X
    Linux (I don't know if either of these are legit, but they seem to check out)

    **You'll also want to make sure that your external IP address isn't changing! Check with your ISP to see if you have a static IP address. If not, they can usually assign you one, if not at a small fee. Otherwise, you won't be able to point domain names at your server.


    Install TeamSpeak Server

    Duh.
    Download
    Extract

    Done. The TeamSpeak 3 server can be run from any directory on your server (I find 'C:\ts3' to work well enough). One other thing you might consider doing is linking a shortcut to the TS3 server executable on your desktop since the TS3 server CANNOT be configured as a service; you'll have to manually start it every time you logout... Actually, you can configure it to run like a service using some other programs, but I think it works fine the way it was designed.


    Port Forward
    ->I Used This<-

    Next, you're going to want to forward your router ports. Most of you know what that means, but for those of you who may be cloudy on the issue, your router accepts requests from the internet on different ports. You can configure your router to sent all the incoming requests on a default ports to a certain computer on the network. I won't cover setting this up because there are some great posts on this forum covering it already, but I'll list the default ports for reference:

    • Voice Port (UDP) : 9987
    • ServerQuery Port (TCP) : 10011
    • FileTransfers Port (TCP) : 30033
    *Always found in the official TS3 knowledgebase


    Awesome so you read all that? Nice, well, I hope you remember your LAN IP Address and your External IP Address, because you'll have to make sure your server is working. On your local TS Client, log into the server using the server's Local IP Address. Redeem your server admin token you got the first time you run the server if you haven't. If you have any friends outside your network who are willing to lend a hand, ask them to connect to the server's External IP Address. Yay, everyone connected and we're having such success! If not, DON'T continue until you've figured it out (i.e. is a firewall blocking the server, is the server running, are you connected to the network?).


    $$Domain Name$$

    This is the only part of this that will cost money. If you didn't come for the domain part... then I guess technically this would be the only optional step. But don't make me bite my tongue. I bought a .net name off GoDaddy for $5 or something.


    Change DNS Settings

    Q:"Why can't I just create a domain redirect to my IP?"
    A:"You can, but if you're registered with a company like mine, the automatic redirect options set your DNS records to point at their servers first. For assurance, I set my own records."

    A lot of people haven't played around with this (I hadn't before I did this), so I'll try to explain slowly. Your domain registrar (GoDaddy for me) will have options to change the DNS settings for each of your domain names. This just means you have to tell the DNS which IP addresses to point each subdomain at http://(www/ts/forums).yourwebsite.net/. So, go to (ok from this point out assume I'm working in GoDaddy) My Account > Manage My Domains and under your domain, select Manage DNS.

    Okay, all DNS settings are universal, so this is the same for everyone. There's a few sections you'll want to know about.

    A (host) Records: These are your main records. Kinda the ones you'll be dealing with. This is where the almighty 'A' (@) variable is declared. The A variable is directly tied to your domain name (whatever.net) and is the IP address that will be contacted when it is accessed without a subdomain or with the "www" subdomain.
    CNAME Records: I just wanted to point out this list of associative name so you could see where the www was mapped to point at the '@' record (most likely). The difference between CName and A records? I guess from what I understand, a CName maps a name to a name (www to @), and an A record points a name to and IP address (@ to XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX)
    MX Records: These are mail server domain records. Cool, right?

    Peronsally, I wanted to create a subdomain (ts.mysite.net) for my TeamSpeak server, so I created an A record that pointed "ts" to my server's External IP Address. At that point, you can set the TTL of the file to 600 seconds or something to try and propagate changes more quickly, but it's going to take some hours before it works for everyone everywhere. Just remember to change it back to alleviate your DNS.

    One last thing I've noticed is because I'm hosting a web server on the same server, my ts subdomain will open our webpage and our webpage address will connect to TeamSpeak. Because I'm running both for the same group of people, I don't care. In fact, I prefer it. But I hope you got something out of this and you're having a grand time being drunk on TS with your friends.
    Last edited by airybear; May 13th, 2014 at 08:28 AM. Reason: Added in extra info

  2. #2
    Join Date
    August 2013
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    22
    Nice tutorial.

    You might want to add:
    - in the static Ip section: use an address outside the routers DHCP-range to avoid any possible IP-address conflicts or use static DHCP, if your router supports that. So you do not need to change IP-settings on your client, but use the clients MAC-address in the router to assign the same IP every time it boots up.

    - Domain-name and DNS-settings: this only works if your internet provider offers static IP-addresses. If you are on dynamic addresses, your IP changes every time your router reconnects to the internet. In this case you need a dynamic DNS-service such as no-ip.com, dyn.com or whatever service (free or paid) you favor. If you want your own domain or subdomain point to the dynamic address, select a domain-provider that offers dyndns for itself or set up a CNAME record to your dyndns name (eg. CNAME ts.yourdomain.net to yourname.no-ip.com).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Winter Park, CO
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    Yeah, I forgot to add a couple things, including that you can't see your domain using your network either, because it points back at you and most modems don't support that. Also that thing about dynamic IP addresses being a pain... I'll make a note of it. I think for most people though, setting their local IP address to a high enough, memorable number on their home network would be sufficient (mines 10.0.0.64).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    December 2004
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    Settings static IP in a LAN served by DHCP server is wrong. If your static IP is not registered on the server, nothing prevent it from addigning the same IP to some other NIC. Result? Your server and that other cleint both will loose network connection.

    And you didn't covered the setting of DNS SRV RR for TS.

  5. #5
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    May 2014
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    It's wrong? Bummer. It works on mine. In fact, it's been working without any problems for the past 70 days since I set it up. Also, no, I didn't cover those things. But, I guess I didn't write this for people who want to learn more about that. In fact, I think my original goal statement was "This is pretty much going to cover the basic steps and terminology so you won't have to do as much research as I did."... Is this thread for you? Probably not.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    RF
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    "It works for me" and "it is the right thing to do" are quite different categories.
    If you did not understand, what I wrote in previous post, you need more experience in the networking technology.
    Whatever people you write a guide for, you absolutely MUST teach good practices.
    Only when you talk between professionals, you MAY suggest a shortcut, that can be clearly understood as such and applied with all due caution.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    June 2011
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    I think there are routers that don't let you connect to the internet unless you have a lease from them.

  8. #8
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    Though, I haven't seen such configurations in use myself, I can easily construct one, if need. (Actually, we discussed a similar setup on our Linux forum, because someone's users got "clever" and begin to manually change their IP's to evade traffic restrictions put up by company administration.)
    This could be another reason to use right tools for the job.

  9. #9
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    ANR, I'll just say we'll have to agree to disagree. I'm sure you know MUCH more about networking than I do (it's not my area of specialty). However, I'm offering a resource to the web that I found unavailable when I was doing my research. However, even though I only have a light understanding at best of what you're talking about, I'm hosting a server that has worked perfectly for everyone that has used it in that manner I wanted to. I don't receive any money for the work I do, so it's not to be considered professional. But I'm able to host a full time TeamSpeak server under a custom domain name, and if you don't know how to do that already, this is probably the easiest place to start.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    September 2014
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    3
    Quote Originally Posted by ANR Daemon View Post
    Settings static IP in a LAN served by DHCP server is wrong. If your static IP is not registered on the server, nothing prevent it from addigning the same IP to some other NIC. Result? Your server and that other cleint both will loose network connection.

    And you didn't covered the setting of DNS SRV RR for TS.
    Correct

    So long as you setup a static ip via your router configuration there's no issue (do not set a static ip in windows for the love of god).

    Port forwarding revolves around the whole premise of setting static IP's or you would need to re-forward all your ports each time you reboot your computer.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    September 2014
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    3
    Quote Originally Posted by hbrui View Post
    Nice tutorial.

    You might want to add:
    - in the static Ip section: use an address outside the routers DHCP-range to avoid any possible IP-address conflicts or use static DHCP, if your router supports that. So you do not need to change IP-settings on your client, but use the clients MAC-address in the router to assign the same IP every time it boots up.

    - Domain-name and DNS-settings: this only works if your internet provider offers static IP-addresses. If you are on dynamic addresses, your IP changes every time your router reconnects to the internet. In this case you need a dynamic DNS-service such as no-ip.com, dyn.com or whatever service (free or paid) you favor. If you want your own domain or subdomain point to the dynamic address, select a domain-provider that offers dyndns for itself or set up a CNAME record to your dyndns name (eg. CNAME ts.yourdomain.net to yourname.no-ip.com).
    Did you actually get it working using the CNAME or are you saying this based on a logical assumption?

    As far as i'm aware (i've tried and failed) a redirect using CNAME will not connect to team-speak. You need to use the SRV option which unfortunately is not available in CPANEL.

    If you did get it workin with the CNAME i'd be interested in knowing how you achieved this.

    FYI - I'm also trying to redirect from subdomain to a hostname.

    Thanks,

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tripkebab View Post
    Port forwarding revolves around the whole premise of setting static IP's
    That's not quite correct statement.
    Port forwarding "revolves around" consistent (persistent, if you wish) IP assignment. There's a definition gap between "statically assigned IP" on client side and "reserved IP" (which is a bit more correct term) on DHCP server side.
    That reserved IP may be within or outside the pool of dynamically assigned addresses, doesn't matter, as the server will (normally) handle the both cases transparently. (I.e. it'll treat reserved IP as assigned for purposes of tracking the available pool of adresses.)

    P.S.
    Some exceptionally stupid webinterfaces explicitly check for reserved IP's to be inside dynamic pool, but normal practice you'd find is to reserve IP's withing LAN mask, but outside dynamic pool to prevent any possible collisions even in cases of dynamic pool overflow.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    September 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by ANR Daemon View Post
    That's not quite correct statement.
    Port forwarding "revolves around" consistent (persistent, if you wish) IP assignment. There's a definition gap between "statically assigned IP" on client side and "reserved IP" (which is a bit more correct term) on DHCP server side.
    That reserved IP may be within or outside the pool of dynamically assigned addresses, doesn't matter, as the server will (normally) handle the both cases transparently. (I.e. it'll treat reserved IP as assigned for purposes of tracking the available pool of adresses.)

    P.S.
    Some exceptionally stupid webinterfaces explicitly check for reserved IP's to be inside dynamic pool, but normal practice you'd find is to reserve IP's withing LAN mask, but outside dynamic pool to prevent any possible collisions even in cases of dynamic pool overflow.
    Agreed, reserved is the correct definition I should have used there.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    August 2017
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    1

    help

    I'm using custom PORT for it. I have domain, ts3 subdomain is set to xxx.xxx.xxx (A). There is not any CNAME or NS record for my domain. Is there a way, to set domain to xxx.xxx.xxx:PORT? Because if I try it, it say Invalid IP address: enter a valid IP address. How to solve it? Thanks

  15. #15
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    February 2015
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